Corporate bonds in an ageing business cycle


IN THE 1970s the junk-bond market was a dark underworld. It was the home of “fallen angels”, the bonds of investment-grade firms that had gone to seed. Most investors were too genteel to hold them. So they traded at hefty discounts to face value. Then Michael Milken, a junk-bond guru, came along with a new gospel. A portfolio of high-yield junk was a better bet than one of supposedly safer bonds. After all, an A-rated bond can only go in one direction—down.

The corporate-bond class system is still in place. Many types of mutual fund are barred from holding non-investment grade (ie, junk) bonds. But junk is no longer a stunted and shameful offspring. The high-yield market in America is now worth $ 1.2trn. And investment-grade bonds have also come down in the world. Around half are rated BBB, a notch above junk. Issuers are slumming it for a reason. A low rating is the price they pay for loading up on cheap debt.

A world with less snobbery of any kind is a…

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Martin is an enthusiastic programmer, a webdeveloper and a young entrepreneur. He is intereted into computers for a long time. In the age of 10 he has programmed his first website and since then he has been working on web technologies until now. He is the Founder and Editor-in-Chief of BriefNews.eu and PCHealthBoost.info Online Magazines. His colleagues appreciate him as a passionate workhorse, a fan of new technologies, an eternal optimist and a dreamer, but especially the soul of the team for whom he can do anything in the world.

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